Category: .NET Core

OpenSource library-versioning

Part 1

Implement Open-source library guidance

Part 2

OpenSource library – Cross-platform targeting

Part 3

OpenSource library-Dependencies

Part 4

OpenSource library- Source Link

Part 5

OpenSource library-versioning

Part 6

OpenSource library- Breaking changes

Part 7

OpenSource library- conclusion

Following recommendations from https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/versioning

Nr

Recomandation

AOP Roslyn

1

CONSIDER using SemVer 2.0.0 to version your NuGet package.

NO

2

DO use the NuGet package version in public documentation as it’s the version number that users will commonly see.

Yes

3

DO include a pre-release suffix when releasing a non-stable package.

No

4

CONSIDER only including a major version in the AssemblyVersion

Yes

5

CONSIDER keeping the major version number of the AssemblyVersion and the NuGet package version in sync.

Yes

6

DO NOT have a fixed AssemblyVersion

Yes

7

CONSIDER including a continuous integration build number as the AssemblyFileVersion revision

Not needed

8

AVOID setting the assembly informational version yourself.

Yes

For 1: I do not like SemVer. It is putting some pressure on the developer of the OpenSource. So I decide to follow Calendar versioning https://calver.org/ 

For 2: Yes, it is normal.

For 3: No, I do not like pore-release.

For 4: Yes – the year is major

For 5: Yes, done by CI process

For 6: Yes, done by CI in Calendar Versioning

For 7: NO. And , because of Calendar versioning, it is already done, if I do not publish 2 versions in the same day

For 8: Do nothing – and it is done.

OpenSource library- publishing

Following the rules at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/publish-nuget-package

Nr

Recomandation

AOP Roslyn

1

DO publish stable packages and pre-release packages you want community feedback on to NuGet.org.

Done

2

CONSIDER publishing pre-release packages to a MyGet feed from a continuous integration build.

No

3

CONSIDER testing packages in your development environment using a local feed or MyGet. Check the package works then publish it to NuGet.org.

Yes

4

DO use a Microsoft account to sign in to NuGet.

Yes

5

DO enable two-factor authentication for accessing NuGet.

Yes

6

DO enable email notification when a package is published.

Yes

For 1: Done already. However, I do not like pre-release packages

For 2: Too much hassle for a single developer. Using instead NuGet

For 3: Yes , I have already a build.bat to do this

For 4: Yes.(NuGet allows only that now)

For 5 : Yes

For 6: Yes.

OpenSource library- Source Link

Part 1

Implement Open-source library guidance

Part 2

OpenSource library – Cross-platform targeting

Part 3

OpenSource library-Dependencies

Part 4

OpenSource library- Source Link

Part 5

OpenSource library-versioning

Part 6

OpenSource library- Breaking changes

Part 7

OpenSource library- conclusion

The documentation at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/sourcelink says to enable source link.


Nr

Recomandation

AOP Roslyn

1

CONSIDER using SourceLink to add source control metadata to your assemblies and NuGet packages.

Modified(1)

2

CONSIDER including symbol files (*.pdb) in the NuGet package.

Done already(2)

For (1) : I have followed the instructions at https://github.com/dotnet/sourcelink/blob/master/README.md

For(2): It was done already by csproj configuration.

OpenSource library–Dependencies

Part 1

Implement Open-source library guidance

Part 2

OpenSource library – Cross-platform targeting

Part 3

OpenSource library-Dependencies

Part 4

OpenSource library- Source Link

Part 5

OpenSource library-versioning

Part 6

OpenSource library- Breaking changes

Part 7

OpenSource library- conclusion

Now trying to respect what it says at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/dependencies .

Nr

Recomandation

AOP Roslyn

1

DO review your .NET library for unnecessary dependencies.

Done manually(1)

2

DO NOT have NuGet package references with no minimum version

Done already(2)

3

AVOID NuGet package references that demand an exact version

Done already(2)

4

AVOID NuGet package references with a version upper limit

Done already(2)

5

CONSIDER referencing shared source packages for small, internal pieces of functionality

N/A(5)

6

CONSIDER making your package a shared source package if it provides small, internal pieces of functionality.

N/A(5)

7

DO reference shared source packages with PrivateAssets=”All”.

N/A(5)

8

DO NOT have shared source package types in your public API.

N/A(5)

9

DO NOT publish shared source packages to NuGet.org.

N/A(5)

For (1): Reviewing .NET library for unnecessary dependencies is practically a manual process. Could be a dotnet global tool – but for the moment I just inspected the .csproj for references and see that all are ncessary

For (2): As I read from documentation “Typically, the package reference version in the project file is the minimum version and there’s no maximum.” .So doing nothing I am at the good point

For (5), I usually put a new dll or NuGet package – I do not share code source. So this is done also without friction.

OpenSource library–Strong naming

The strong naming is something that I have not have done usually, so it will be interesting following https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/strong-naming .

Nr

Recomandation

AOP Roslyn

1

CONSIDER strong naming your library’s assemblies.

Not –see below

2

CONSIDER adding the strong naming key to your source control system.

easy- not

3

CONSIDER incrementing the assembly version
on only major version changes to help
users reduce binding redirects, and how often they’re updated.

not

4

DO NOT add, remove, or change the strong naming key.

easy- not

5

DO NOT publish strong-named and non-strong-named versions of your library.

easy – not

I have tried to add signing – it is pretty easy in Visual Studio to generate a new pfx fiel to sign code. However, when compiling, it requires all dependencies to be signed

CSC : error CS8002: Referenced assembly ‘PortableConsoleLibs, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=null’ does not have a strong name. [C:\projects\aop-with-roslyn\AOPRoslyn\aopCmd\aop.csproj]

So , if one of your referenced libraries is not code signed, it is a big no

The other requirements are pretty easy..

OpenSource library – Cross-platform targeting

Part 1

Implement Open-source library guidance

Part 2

OpenSource library – Cross-platform targeting

Part 3

OpenSource library-Dependencies

Part 4

OpenSource library- Source Link

Part 5

OpenSource library-versioning

Part 6

OpenSource library- Breaking changes

Part 7

OpenSource library- conclusion

At https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/cross-platform-targeting there are the recommendations  for Cross platform. Let’s see what needs to be done for https://github.com/ignatandrei/AOP_With_Roslyn

Let’s see:

 

Nr Recommandation AOP Roslyn
1 DO start with including a netstandard2.0 target. Done – the main dll, AOPRoslyn, is already .netstandard2,0
2 AVOID including a netstandard1.x target. Not needed
3 DO include a netstandard2.0 target if you require a netstandard1.x target. Not needed
4 DO NOT include a .NET Standard target if the library relies on a platform-specific app model. Not needed
5 CONSIDER targeting .NET implementations in addition to .NET Standard. Not needed
6 AVOID using multi-targeting with .NET Standard if your source code is the same for all targets. Not needed
7 CONSIDER adding a target for net461 when you’re offering a netstandard2.0 target. OK> see later point 9

 

8 DO distribute your library using a NuGet package. Done

https://www.nuget.org/packages/dotnet-aop

 

9 DO use a project file’s TargetFrameworks property when multi-targeting Struggle to implement/ partially done – modified AOPRoslyn.csproj
10 CONSIDER using MSBuild.Sdk.Extras when multi-targeting for UWP and Xamarin as it greatly simplifies your project file. Not needed
11 DO NOT include a Portable Class Library (PCL) target. OK
12 DO NOT include targets for .NET platforms that are no longer supported. Not needed

I tried to modify to include

<TargetFrameworks>netstandard2.0;net461</TargetFrameworks>

( Attention: Framework, not Framework)

First , you should publish the .csproj

dotnet publish <path to csproj>

should be modified with -f=”netstandard2.0″

Then , each dependency should support it :

error NU1202: Package PortableConsoleLibs 1.0.0 is not compatible with net461 (.NETFramework,Version=v4.6.1). Package PortableConsoleLibs 1.0.0 supports: netcoreapp2.0 (.NETCoreApp,Version=v2.0)

So you should contact the owners to support it – or re-compile the sources, if you have.

So I will stick with

“DO NOT include targets for .NET platforms that are no longer supported.” including NET461.

Conclusion: 11 / 12 it is a good score.

Implement Open-source library guidance

Part 1

Implement Open-source library guidance

Part 2

OpenSource library – Cross-platform targeting

Part 3

OpenSource library-Dependencies

Part 4

OpenSource library- Source Link

Part 5

OpenSource library-versioning

Part 6

OpenSource library- Breaking changes

Part 7

OpenSource library- conclusion

I have written previously a booklet about “Making Open Source Component from idea to deploy With examples from .NET Core” .

Now  Microsoft and contributors make a library guidance for OpenSource projects at https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/standard/library-guidance/  . I will take as a working point my component, https://github.com/ignatandrei/AOP_With_Roslyn , and see where it goes and how many things I already implemented.

The items are:

Cross-platform targeting   
Strong naming   
NuGet and open-source libraries   
Dependencies   
SourceLink   
Publishing   
Versioning   

I will implement each one in one blog post

My Async Await tutorials

Rule of thumb: just await / async from top to down.

 

To deeply understand async await in .NET Core , please follow the following resources:

 

1. https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechDays/Techdays-2014-the-Netherlands/Async-programming-deep-dive  – to gain inner knowledge about what code is async / await

2. Read https://blog.stephencleary.com/2012/02/async-and-await.html to have started into async await

3. Read MSDN for a better understanding : https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/jj991977.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

4. Common pitfalls in ASP.NET  Framework( not in console! ) with async await: https://blog.stephencleary.com/2012/07/dont-block-on-async-code.html

5. No problem in ASP.NET Core: https://blog.stephencleary.com/2017/03/aspnetcore-synchronization-context.html

Happy reading !

.NET Core And Angular at CodeCamp Bucuresti

I have presented on Saturday at https://bucuresti.codecamp.ro/ a technical talk about how to make a fast POC that can run on Web, Desktop and Mobile , The presentation will show a clear example of code that is necessary for that ( code at https://github.com/ignatandrei/angNetCoreDemo/  ).

You can see working demo without CORS at https://ang-net-core.herokuapp.com/ , with CORS at https://ignatandrei.github.io/AngNetCoreDemo/ and a Mobile app at https://app.bitrise.io/artifact/9332781/p/ef7a0b7e945d69e01697390dcef867de

It was a good opportunity to learn something new at the conference – many good technical tracks and old friends that is an opportunity to see again.

Latest commits notes from github

For AOP with Roslyn I want to automatically get the latest commits message before doing a new commit.

This was  solved easily using https://github.com/octokit/octokit.net 

The code is  very simple:

public async Task<DateForCommit[]> BetweenLatest2Commits()
{
           
var client = new GitHubClient(new ProductHeaderValue("GitBetweenCommits"));
var rep = await client.Repository.Get(Author, RepositoryName);
var relLatest = await client.Repository.Release.GetLatest(rep.Id);
var relAll = await client.Repository.Release.GetAll(rep.Id, new ApiOptions() { PageSize = int.MaxValue - 1 });
var relBeforeLatest = relAll.OrderByDescending(it => it.CreatedAt).Skip(1).FirstOrDefault();

var dateLatest = relLatest.CreatedAt;
var dateBeforeLatest = relBeforeLatest.CreatedAt;

var commits = await client.Repository.Commit.GetAll(rep.Id, ApiOptions.None);
var res = commits
    .Where(it => 
    it.Commit.Author.Date >= dateBeforeLatest
    &&
    it.Commit.Author.Date<=dateLatest
    )
    .Select(it => new DateForCommit()
    {
        Author = it.Commit.Author.Name,
        Message = it.Commit.Message,
        CommitDate = it.Commit.Author.Date.DateTime
    })
    .ToArray();
return res;
}

It works also as a .NET Global tool
Install with

dotnet tool install –global dotnet-gcr

run with

dotnet gcr

for example for https://github.com/ignatandrei/AOP_With_Roslyn the arguments are

dotnet gcr ignatandrei AOP_With_Roslyn

NuGet at https://www.nuget.org/packages/dotnet-gcr/

Full Code at https://github.com/ignatandrei/GitCommitsBetweenReleases
enjoy